News:

Christmas Newsletter 2018

Due to changes to our normal opening hours, we are asking everyone to check supplies of their pet’s medications and food and order early so we can ensure delivery from our suppliers in time. Also, if your pet is upset by fireworks, now is the time to get treatments ordered and ready for the inevitable fireworks that will beckon in the New Year.

Prescription requests can be submitted via the phone or by filling out a form on our website. Please visit www.spavets.co.uk for more information. Whilst there, why not register your pet in our Client Portal system- here you can keep track of routine treatments such as boosters and parasite control as well as view pending appointments.

We wanted to take this opportunity to wish all our clients and their pets a very happy Christmas and New Year. 

Please be aware, there is a vet available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year should your pet need us in an emergency.

CHRISTMAS OPENING HOURS

Painswick Road Surgery

Sat 22nd & Sun 23rd December:

  • Normal opening hours 

Christmas Eve 24th December:

  • Open 8am-3pm
  • Open surgery 9-10am
  • Appointments 2-3pm (urgent cases)

Christmas Day- CLOSED

Boxing Day- CLOSED

Thursday 27th-Sunday 30th December

  • Normal opening hours

New Year’s Eve 31st December:

  • Open 8am-3pm
  • Open surgery 9-10am
  • Appointments 2-3pm (urgent cases)

New Year’s Day- CLOSED

Wednesday 2nd January:

  • Normal opening hours resume.

Quedgeley Surgery

Saturday 22nd December:

  • Normal opening hours

Christmas Eve 24th December

  • Open 8am-1pm
  • Appointments 8.45-9.45am
  • Open surgery 12-1pm

Christmas Day- CLOSED

Boxing Day- CLOSED

Thursday 27th - Sunday 30th December

  • Normal opening hours

New Year’s Eve 31st December:

  • Open 8am-1pm
  • Appointments 8.45-9.45am
  • Open surgery 12-1pm

New Year’s Day- CLOSED

Wednesday 2nd January:

  • Normal opening hours resume.

Common Christmas Poisons and Hazards for Pets

Chocolate

Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine which are toxic to dogs. The type and   quantity of chocolate ingested will affect the level of toxicity and danger to your dog with dark and baking chocolate being the most dangerous, making even small amount possibly toxic

Christmas Pudding (grapes, sultanas, raisins and currants)

These fruits are poisonous to dogs, causing kidney problems and even kidney failure. Around Christmas, these fruits are found in Christmas cake, Christmas pudding, mince pies and some chocolate.

Tinsel and ribbons

Cats and dogs may like playing with tinsel and ribbon from presents and tree

decorations. It is not un-common for pets to eat these and they may require surgery to remove them. If your pet is known to be a ‘chewer’, never leave him/her unsupervised. Decorations or even parts of toys can be swallowed and can become stuck in the digestive system.

Bones and table scraps

Bones should not be fed to pets, especially turkey and chicken bones which splinter when chewed. Bone fragments may damage the digestive tract when swallowed or cause a blockage. String from meat joints can cause a blockage if ingested and several foods from your plate may be toxic to your pet. Onions and garlic for instance contain a substance that destroys red blood cells and can cause severe anaemia.

Anti-freeze

Anti-freeze is extremely toxic to cats. Due to its ‘sweet’ taste, they find it very appealing and may lick any spills they come across.  Symptoms are seen almost immediately, including vomiting, wobbliness, twitching, head tremors and increased thirst. In severe cases kidney failure and death will often occur if not treated immediately- a few hours can make a huge difference.

Lilies

Lilies are toxic to cats. Cats may eat the petals, or if they brush up against them, the pollen can get onto their coat and be ingested when they groom themselves but all parts are toxic, including the water they stand in!

Xylitol

Xylitol is a substance that is used as a sugar substitute in many products such as cakes and chewing gum. This substance is highly toxic to dogs and cats when ingested. It is quickly absorbed into the blood stream, causing a release of insulin. This causes hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar), which cause seizures or liver failure and can be life threatening.

 

If you suspect that your pet has eaten something they shouldn’t, please contact the surgery as soon as possible. Please have to hand, if possible, the packaging of what has been ingested so we can determine the ingredients, quantities and risks posed to your pet. We offer a 24 hour emergency service so you can always speak to a vet should you have any concerns.